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Charleston, SC 29401
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Retaliation

Title VII and most state’s statutes prohibit retaliation against any person who opposes or complains about sexual harassment or sex discrimination, or any other violation of Title VII or the ADA, in the workplace. This prohibition against retaliation also applies to individuals who participate in an investigation into unlawful employment conductor practices.

Title VII specifically prohibits employers from discriminating against any employee or any applicant who “opposed … an unlawful employment practice” or “made a charge, testified, assisted or participated in any manner in an investigation, proceeding or hearing under this subchapter.” 42 U.S.C. §2000d-3(a). The first section of Title VII cited above is often referred to as the “opposition clause.” The second section of Title VII cited above is known as the “participation clause.”

The opposition clause provides protection for individuals who informally oppose an employer’s illegal activities under title VII or activities that the individual reasonably believes to be unlawful under Title VII. An employee’s opposition to unlawful employment practices can take many different forms and need not involve opposition in the form of a formal proceeding. An employee can oppose unlawful employment practices by doing things such as supporting a coworker’s claim of discrimination, threatening to file a charge of discrimination, reporting sexual harassment or discrimination against other employees, complaining to a supervisor about workplace sexual harassment, or otherwise informally speaking out against illegal employment activities. Courts use a balancing test to determine which activities fall under the opposition clause of Title VII.

 

The participation clause strictly prohibits retaliation against individuals for notification of potential violations of Title VII and for testifying, assisting, or participating in any investigation, proceeding, or hearing under Title VII.

 

Explore Further:

Wrongful Termination

Unpaid Overtime Claims

Unpaid Wage Claims

Family Medical Leave Act

Severance Agreements

Covenants Not to Compete

Sexual Harassment

Discrimination

Retaliation

Defamation

Breach of Contract

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